Bangladesh and Germany

When I choose countries to look at, I compared the Netherlands with a high income and low-income country, Bangladesh and Germany. Interestingly enough, Bangladesh has achieved two SDG’s, responsible consumption and production and climate action, which are two SDG’s that remain a major challenge to Germany. Something to note is that although there are color indicators for ease of interpretation, it is not a foolproof way to look at the measurement of how well a country is doing. In many cases, if you look at the higher ranked countries (Germany), they do not necessarily have more green or yellow than the next country (Bangladesh). This reflects the complexity of sustainability as it is first off, a multidisciplinary subject, but also within each category, there are numerous measurements that are in and of themselves, also extremely multidisciplinary. One thing however, is that Germany is improving in almost every aspect while Bangladesh has two SDG’s that are decreasing and straying farther from the target. This is a better indicator as to how well a country is doing, as improvement is extremely valuable when looking to the future.

The image that I choose slightly reflects the agriculture and hunger situation in Bangladesh. It is an image of bt brinjal eggplants, which are genetically modified eggplants that Bangladesh has started using in recent years to increase crop yields. This is part of their growing effort to achieve their zero hunger goal, which is slowly improving. Bangladesh has looked to different methods to increase nutrition (including micronutrients and not just calories) which is important, because although their cereal yield is at an acceptable level, cereal provides minimal nutrients and only fulfills caloric requirements. This is also interesting in the sense that it shows that although there are improvements to agriculture, stunting and wasting remains an issue because of distribution, which stems from a lack of proper infrastructure.

Image credit: Arif Hossain

https://allianceforscience.cornell.edu/blog/2015/11/bt-brinjal-beyond-boundaries/

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